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Thursday, 31 March 2011

Guy Fawkes Day

Guy Fawkes Day Sub-Zero owned the cold, frozen night in Auckland. The sky was pitch dark, and the right sort of colour for fireworks to light it up on Guy Fawkes Night. Everyone was waiting for the crashes and the bangs. Suddenly…. Fireworks shot, Sky lit, Kids screamed. Bang! Bang! Bang! Crash! Boom!!! The grass lit up from the spinning cascades and dogs ran yelping around in fear and confusion at what was happening. “Don’t get too close to the fireworks,” the parents warned. The best fireworks had only begun. Benjamin

Guy Fawkes Day

Guy Fawkes It was a clear black night at my back yard with my family with most of the fireworks ready so we can start our night off with a loud kaboomb! 3 seconds later, hearing bangs all over Auckland, it felt like a storm was coming. The fireworks in different colours it was like a sparkling rainbow. All you can see is green, red, yellow and blue. It was awesome! I can’t wait for next year ! BY THOMAS

Tuesday, 29 March 2011

THAT WAS TONGAPORUTU

THAT WAS TONGAPORUTU Remember when we all used to go to Tongaporutu to stay at Uncle Harry’s bach? We had one large room for all the girls, both old and young and a small room for the boys because the girls outnumbered the men by 3 to 1. The fire had to be lit in the coal range to do any cooking because there were no take aways apart from fish and chips in Mokau up the road and housework was kept to a minimum. That was Tongaporutu Remember when we used to go out to the sea when the tide was out? We could go out to the river mouth and round by the caves but one time the tide caught us unawares and we had to scramble back round the rocks and I cried but you were older and a stronger swimmer and we got back safely and both our mothers were worried and cross but so relieved when we turned up safe and sound. That was Tongaporutu Remember when we had to use the long drop out the back of the bach? It was dark and smelly and you could get splinters off the wooden seat and there were always spiders in very thick webs that lurked over your head and at night the possums would land on the roof and give you a heck of a fright. And baths were taken out in the wash house in the old tin bath that hung on a nail on the wall which was just like something out of the 1900’s and the cleanest person always got the first bath and by the time you got in the water was cold and rather dirty, but you did it anyway because it was a struggle to get hot water. You had to boil water in big aluminium buckets on top of the coal range and carry it out to the wash house. That was Tongaporutu THAT WAS TONGAPORUTU Remember when we all used to go to Tongaporutu to stay at Uncle Harry’s bach? We had one large room for all the girls, both old and young and a small room for the boys because the girls outnumbered the men by 3 to 1. The fire had to be lit in the coal range to do any cooking because there were no take aways apart from fish and chips in Mokau up the road and housework was kept to a minimum. That was Tongaporutu Remember when we used to go out to the sea when the tide was out? We could go out to the river mouth and round by the caves but one time the tide caught us unawares and we had to scramble back round the rocks and I cried but you were older and a stronger swimmer and we got back safely and both our mothers were worried and cross but so relieved when we turned up safe and sound. That was Tongaporutu Remember when we had to use the long drop out the back of the bach? It was dark and smelly and you could get splinters off the wooden seat and there were always spiders in very thick webs that lurked over your head and at night the possums would land on the roof and give you a heck of a fright. And baths were taken out in the wash house in the old tin bath that hung on a nail on the wall which was just like something out of the 1900’s and the cleanest person always got the first bath and by the time you got in the water was cold and rather dirty, but you did it anyway because it was a struggle to get hot water. You had to boil water in big aluminium buckets on top of the coal range and carry it out to the wash house. That was Tongaporutu